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10 things estates & fire safety managers missed on Twitter

Twitter is a marvellous thing. It’s a constant feed of people’s innermost thoughts, as if everyone’s subconscious has suddenly been given a voice. I’m always intrigued by what people say in their tweets, especially students. For me, it’s an invaluable resource of comments and new ideas. It really allows me to understand some of the everyday problems that students face. If you work in estates management or fire safety at any of the UK’s 130-ish universities and you haven’t already, it’s worth getting yourself on Twitter. You would be surprised at what people are saying about your facilities!

Here are 10 things that university estates and fire safety teams are missing

1. Students are taking it upon themselves to ‘repair’ fire doors.

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2. Many students are forced to perform unexpected and dexterous trials.


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3. Fire doors are plain, old fashioned bullies.

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4. And they try to keep you from your friends.

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5. The transition from using fire doors to domestic doors can be painful.

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6. Students just don’t understand that they’re seven times more likely to have a fire
.

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7. Some methods of making them aware of this are better received than others.

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8. Fire doors are noisy neighbours.

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9. And they’re just too heavy.

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10. Rules about fairy lights seem to be controversial.

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Not that it’s stopped some people…

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And there you have it. Some informative (and some not so informative) messages from students. But what should we take away from this?

Well, overwhelmingly it’s clear that fire doors create some major problems, largely due to their weight and a lack of understanding about what fire doors are designed to do. There are some simple solutions to these problems which I can help you with.

This is just a glimpse at some of the countless tweets from students struggling with their fire doors. There were so many more that I wanted to include but there just isn’t enough time in the day. If you struggle to find these little gems in the Twittersphere you can follow me on Twitter, @That_Fireco_Guy, and I’ll do the hard work for you and keep you ‘down with the kids’ (that’s what the kids say now, right?).

 

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