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Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

On February 22nd 2021, Boris Johnson laid out his roadmap for getting England’s services and institutions back open. Within this, it was announced that schools would reopen on March 8th with non-essential shops and outdoor venues to follow on April 12th. 

Following on from this, Chancellor Rishi Sunak declared he was providing £408 million in a support package designed to aid the struggling cultural sector. As the likes of museums, galleries, cinemas and libraries also prepare to reopen over the coming weeks, this provides some much-needed funding to help look after customers in the post-lockdown landscape. 

The smart and safe welcome back to work

The chief concern for any return to an indoor venue is infection prevention, and there are many ways to improve the customer experience whilst ensuring safety measures are upheld. To enable a successful transition where we can all fully enjoy the experience of going out again, these simply can’t afford to be short-term measures. 

Hygiene control will include:

  • Ample ventilation with fresh air regularly replaced
  • A widespread reduction of touchpoints
  • Temperature checks
  • PPE for staff 
  • The adoption of social bubbles 
  • Sanitisation points.  

The initial welcome will be vital for reassuring customers that your establishment is safe. Proprietors need to send out the message from the outset that they’re serious about the well-being of their clientele. 

Our Germgard products meet these requirements to perfection. Available in 3 different formats, they provide a welcome reminder on arrival to sanitise your hands before entering.  

 

Germgard station helps businesses reopen safely

 

Leave hygiene worries at the door with Germgard 

Our portable Germgard Station is a smart sanitising station, perfect for reception areas and lobbies of hospitality establishments. Like a hygienic gatekeeper, it uses a Passive Infrared (PIR) Sensor which detects when someone is approaching the door. The connected screen will display a message to remind the user to sanitise their hands. When the user cleans their hands, a customised message will appear and then grant entry. There is also the option to personalise the messages and graphics that customers will see.

Germgard can be used as a stand-alone system or it can be integrated with electronic door locks, automatic doors, and access control systems.

For maintaining cleanliness when entering interior rooms such as canteens, meeting rooms and toilets, the smaller, wall-mounted Germgard Lite is the ideal solution. It’s a screenless access control system that also demands the use of hand sanitiser before gaining entry. Once a user has cleaned their hands with the Bluetooth unit, the door will open.

Going with the flow 

Once customers have entered the building, successful hygiene measures dictate that it’s imperative to have good ventilation throughout. As Sir Patrick Vallance explained for the Government on 22nd Feb when discussing a return to schools, “…ventilation is going to be important as children go back, good ventilation.” 

This is where Fireco products can successfully integrate to boost hygiene-control in buildings. After entering the main doors, all interior fire doors can be kept safely open with our Dorgard devices. As well as being an effective fire safety tool, these wireless retainers can increase the flow of ventilation throughout any establishment whilst also reducing touchpoints. Quick and easy to install, they’ll only close when hearing any fire alarm that lasts more than 14 seconds. Simple, unobtrusive and effective, it’s no wonder we’ve sold over a million units since their launch.  

Ultimately it’s about creating a new, safe and welcoming type of visitor experience that stands the test of time. It’s obvious that hygiene-control is an essential factor in the success of this.

Fireco can help you safely welcome back your customers with a comprehensive return to work hygiene strategy. Call us on 01273 320650. 

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

In the Government press conference on the 22nd February, it was announced that all schools will reopen on the 8th March, and depending on how successful this is in keeping infection cases down, will determine whether we move to the next stage of lockdown easing. During that press conference, Sir Patrick Vallance reiterated the key measures for keeping schools Covid-secure

“ In schools, ventilation is going to be important as children go back, good ventilation. Masks will add to the protection, and hand washing and good hand hygiene adds to the protection ”

Why is ventilation so important when keeping schools Covid-secure?

To understand how ventilation helps, there have been many studies and articles explaining this.

The Government’s ‘Hands, Face, Space’ campaign stated that Coronavirus particles will remain in the air for much longer than Coronavirus droplets as they are far smaller and lighter. Recent research led by the University of Cambridge with Imperial College London, researchers found that:

“In poorly ventilated spaces, the virus behind COVID-19 can spread further than two metres in seconds, and is far more likely to spread through prolonged talking than through coughing”.

In October 2020, Spanish Newspaper El PaÍs published an insightful article; “A room, a bar and a classroom: how the coronavirus is spread through the air”, which examined how transmission varies in these different environments depending on the precautions in place. Inside a classroom of 24 students with a teacher who has Covid-19 (and no counter-measures being taken), up to 12 students could become infected within 2hrs. This reduces to 5 students when face masks are used. When ventilation is introduced the risk drops dramatically to one person or less. The importance that ventilation plays in reducing the spread of Covid transmission was promoted equally in all scenarios. All included opening doors as well as windows as part of ventilation measures.

Good airflow can protect against the asymptomatic

In November, the not-for-profit media website The Conversation published an article written by Shelly Miller, the Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado in Boulder, where she wrote on how keeping indoor air clean can reduce the chance of spreading coronavirus. She reminds us that 40% of cases are asymptomatic, which can help explain how a teacher can end up addressing a classroom when no countermeasures against the virus are taken. Her guidance on airflow in the home states:

“A typical air exchange rate for a home is around 0.5 air changes per hour. Because of the complicated way air moves, that translates into taking about two hours to replace two-thirds of the air inside an average home, and about six hours to replace all of it …//… In a pandemic this should be higher, and the World Health Organization recently recommended six air changes per hour”.

All of this is supported by The Hands, Face, Space campaign which said:

“Research shows that being in a room with fresh air can reduce the risk of infection from particles by over 70%”.

What does Government guidance say?

With Councils and the Health & Safety Executive having further powers to shut premises for not being Covid-secure, it is important to take all necessary precautions to comply with Government and public expectations. The Department of Education’s ‘Higher education: operational guidance’ makes it clear about what is expected from educational establishments in regards to ventilation:

  • You should ensure that all indoor and covered areas have good ventilation in addition to other methods of risk reduction.
  • Where possible, poorly ventilated spaces should be adapted to improve ventilation or, if that is not possible, they should not be used as a teaching/learning location.
  • You should consider ways to maintain and increase the supply of fresh air, for example, by opening windows and doors (excluding fire doors) – we’ll come back to this point shortly.
  • Also, consider if you can improve the circulation of outside air and prevent pockets of stagnant air in occupied spaces.
  • Air conditioning systems should rely on fresh rather than recycled air

With Educational Secretary Nick Gibb announcing on the 25th February that it will not be made compulsory for students to wear face coverings in class, ventilation has become even more vital in keeping transmission rates down. But with many classrooms having one entry point and that door usually being a fire door, is the Government right to be saying they cannot be held open?

Can fire doors be held open to improve ventilation?

Since 23rd March 2020 (the day of the first lockdown announcement), nearly 10,000 people have viewed Fireco’s blog “is it illegal to wedge open a fire door”. With all the pressure on businesses to be COVID-secure, people have been seeking clarification on whether this takes precedence over fire safety.

On the 15th April 2020, the Fire Industry Association (FIA) managed to get clarification from the Minister for the State for Security, the Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP, that Key Worker status applied to all fire industry employees providing essential services.

Also that month, the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) released their guidance; Covid-19 – Protection – Advice to Businesses, to provide consistency for Fire and Rescue Services when issuing guidance to businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the COVID-19 Protection Fire Safety FAQs they make it clear that the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 still applies and that it is “the duty of the Responsible Person to ensure risk from fire is identified and suitable measures implemented”. One key point raised was the issue of wedging fire doors:

“Q. Can we wedge open fire doors to stop people from touching handles?

A. No, fire doors are an important fire safety measure, keep fire doors closed and follow government advice on hand washing and cleansing hard surfaces. Fire doors can only be held open by automatic releasing hold-open devices specifically designed and installed for this purpose”.

Unlike the Department of Education’s ‘Higher education: operational guidance’, it is made clear that rather than using a door wedge, there are legal and compliant ways to hold open a fire door that can be used to increase ventilation and reduce touchpoints.

Keeping schools Covid-secure with Fireco

In 2020, Fireco saw unprecedented demand for its Dorgard range, as companies from all sectors saw it as the quick, easy and compliant way to satisfy both fire safety and COVID-safety requirements within their buildings. Fireco’s Dorgard range has been a market leader for retrofit fire door retainers for over 25 years and by September 2020 we had sold our millionth Dorgard. One of the reasons for this surge in demand during the pandemic is the fact that Dorgard is ready straight from the box and only takes four screws to attach to the door – a simple task for any handyman.

Every type of workplace has invested in Dorgards – ranging from primary schools & care homes to social media giants & Grand Prix teams – and this is expected to continue now that the Government has laid out the roadmap for easing restrictions. It’s been made clear that in order to have our freedom back in June, we need to keep infection rates down and increasing ventilation will be fundamental in achieving this.

Buy Dorgard today and improve ventilation to help keep your school COVID-secure.

Written by James Cox, Senior Sales Manager at Fireco.

Fresh air is good for your brain

Fresh air is good for your brain

Summer is finally here, and the sun is shining (sometimes). As the weather improves, people in workplaces often suffer with uncomfortable working conditions — either stuffy and hot or freezing cold from temperamental air conditioning. It can be difficult to know what to wear from one day to the next!

A lack of fresh air circulating through buildings can really cause problems in the summer months. Many studies have shown the importance of ventilation and fresh air in the workplace. Study after study has shown that the amount of fresh air brought inside is important for health.

Good ventilation has been shown to reduce sick building syndrome and people taking days off for illness. Sick building syndrome, caused by poorly designed and ventilated buildings, includes symptoms such as eye irritation, headaches, coughing and chest tightness.

A recent Harvard University study found that breathing better air lead to significantly better decision-making among participants. The authors of the study strongly recommended that employers take action to optimise air quality to improve employees’ health and productivity.

A healthier environment

There are many other factors that contribute to an unhealthy work environment, such as sitting at a desk for long periods of time, bad posture, unhealthy snacking and a lack of movement during the day. When considering all health and safety matters in the workplace, it is important to ensure that air quality for employees is as good as it can be.

Better air helps workers think better, and improves productivity and health. Closed doors throughout an office can reduce the amount of fresh air that flows around a building, leading to poor ventilation.

Fire doors need to be closed to protect workers and buildings in the event of fire, so it’s important to find ways that hold them open legally, allowing them to close automatically when an alarm sounds. Fireco can help with solutions that do just that.

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Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

After Boris Johnson laid out his roadmap for getting England’s services and institutions back open, Chancellor Rishi Sunak declared he was providing £408 million in a support package designed to aid the struggling cultural sector. As museums, galleries, cinemas and libraries prepare to reopen over the coming weeks, how can Germgard and other Fireco products help with their hygiene control strategy?

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

In the Government press conference on the 22nd February, it was announced that all schools will reopen on the 8th March and depending on how successful this is in keeping infection cases down, will determine whether we move to the next stage of lockdown easing. In that press conference Sir Patrick Vallance reiterated the measures that help reduce infection in schools.

25 years of fire safety compliance

25 years of fire safety compliance

Since the launch of Dorgard 25 years ago, we have introduced two more versions offering you different levels of fire safety compliance so you can ditch the door wedge!

And breathe! How ventilation improves your residents’ well-being

And breathe! How ventilation improves your residents’ well-being

Summer is on its way, and with the weather heating up, indoor air quality could be compromised. Residents can be left feeling hot and groggy if there isn’t enough natural air coming in.

Natural ventilation improves your general quality of life which provides a healthier mind, body and positive sense of well-being. With this in mind, it’s clear to see how there is no better substitute for fresh air.

So what are some of the other great reasons to allow more fresh air into your home?

Happier residents
Breathing in more oxygen significantly raises serotonin in the body — a chemical that lightens your mood and promotes a sense of happiness and relaxation.

Stronger immune system
Fresh air helps the body to fight off illness! Oxygen makes your white blood cells stronger so you can kill germs and bacteria. A stronger immune system will reduce the risk of feeling poorly.

More energy
Wake up and stop fatigue in its tracks! Feeling hot and stuffy can make you feel drained and lethargic. A simple dose of fresh air will leave you feeling more invigorated and alive.

You might also like

Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

Germgard: Opening your building to safer measures 

After Boris Johnson laid out his roadmap for getting England’s services and institutions back open, Chancellor Rishi Sunak declared he was providing £408 million in a support package designed to aid the struggling cultural sector. As museums, galleries, cinemas and libraries prepare to reopen over the coming weeks, how can Germgard and other Fireco products help with their hygiene control strategy?

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

Why ventilation is the secret weapon to keeping schools COVID-secure

In the Government press conference on the 22nd February, it was announced that all schools will reopen on the 8th March and depending on how successful this is in keeping infection cases down, will determine whether we move to the next stage of lockdown easing. In that press conference Sir Patrick Vallance reiterated the measures that help reduce infection in schools.

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